Homeschooling Your Kids

How you homeschool your kids will be unique to you and your children. There is no “one-size-fits-all approach”. When you decide to take on this enormous task, you are entering “as if” a new world and you will require a tribe to help navigate through the uncharted territory and support your efforts. There are many professionals who are skilled in many areas to help you.

It takes more than just one or two people to raise a child; it takes a whole group of people and that’s why we are fortunate to have so many resources available to us via our connectivity resources and technologies through our devices online and which extend around the world. The gas-burning old yellow school bus needn’t run everyday in order to accomplish the task of many kinds of learning.

1. Keep a routine, but be flexible.

There are many ways, for instance, to learn basic arithmetic and language skills.

Portioning dough is division. Measuring the distance of a homemade running track or obstacle course gives a real world spatial sense of what the numbers mean. Planning a menu and executing it requires a lot of thought. It provides opportunities for all kinds of learning. Use your imagination.

2. Choose topics that interest your child. Choose the things that hold their attention for longer. Don’t force them. Be gentle and let them lead you to a certain extent. Their particular gifts will reveal themselves over time. Have fun!

3. Find online resources and use them. You don’t need to recreate the making of a wheel that’s already been made. Many educational websites are free to use.

4. Allow time for a break and make sure that if the style of learning that has taken place has been largely sedentary— that break should involve getting outside and getting fresh air.

5. Switch up the days. Too much of the “same-ole-same-ole” can be boring. A change is as good as a rest. Continually seek out new ways of doing things especially if the old ways don’t seem to be working.

6. Go easy on yourself. You don’t need to have six hours of structured schoolwork everyday.

7. Play games. Board games like Monopoly are good for counting. Scrabble is good for word building. Lots of opportunities out there.

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Other Ideas:

Teach your child how to keep a journal and fill it with memorabilia.

Learn skipping songs.

Online dance or yoga classes.

Kitchen science experiments like baking soda mixed with vinegar.

Garden projects.

There are so many opportunities it’s impossible to list, but carpe diem! You can seize the day and make it great for learning!

Problems and Opportunities

Whether we like to admit it or not, our biggest problems are really not what we think they are.  Although most of us have difficulties or what we often view as problems at various times in our lives we don’t spend very much time thinking about why they occurred, or what if anything we might have done to stem its flow before it started.

For most people problems stem from 4 main areas:problems-3

1)  Someone or something else and we have now control whatsoever.
2)  We created pretty much the entire problem.
3)  Someone or something happened, but the problem was created by our reaction or lack there of.
4)  It’s not really a problem at all, but we’re reacting like it is (they are opportunities).

More than half of what we perceive as problems are rooted in what we perceive to be our own limitations (ourselves), and they could have been avoided by us.  By either thinking and planning out what we could or would do, or by changing our attitude and how we react.  Rarely are problems really problems.  More than half of what we perceive as problems are actually just misinterpreted opportunities.

In order to stop this from happening we have to change ourselves.  Before we can change anything we need to change our way of thinking, change the way our brain responds.  The most basic human cognitive function is to ask questions.  If we think about something, try to reason it out we are questioning ourselves.  We already do this all the time.  Is the light turning red or green, should I turn left or right, what did they say?

Start to pay attention to the questions that your brain is asking yourself on a daily basis, as you go through your day.  This is the self-talk, the self-questioning that is happening all the time.  Once we become aware of the questions we are asking ourselves, we can begin to take control of those questions and actually ask questions that mean something.  As we get better doing this we will begin asking great questions and we’ll begin to get great answers, if we’re don’t we won’t.

Once we are aware of the automatic questions we are asking ourselves, we can start to ask two questions that we’ve all heard, but paid very little attention to.  They are:

1) What if?what if i could
2) Why Not?

Just by asking ourselves these questions, we will begin to open up the possibilities they bring with them.

What if I Could?  What would that look like?
I know I can’t, but what if I could?  What would it look like?

We can start out asking these in a general way.  When a potential problem or  opportunity presents itself to you, even if it seems impossible, keep asking.  Try it now, think about something that you have already perceived as a problem.  What if I could _____________ (and fill in the blank).  Just say it to yourself.  What if I could _____________ (and fill in the blank).  Well, What If I Could Do That?  What would it look like?  I know I can’t, but what if I could?

By asking these questions of yourself, It doesn’t mean your going to do it.  But counter intuitively this is the actual power behind the questions, your’e not putting anything on the line, there is zero commitment on your part right now.  Anything is possible, but as soon as you ask the question your brain makes a fundamental change.  Instead of thinking of reasons to stop you from doing it, it starts thinking of reasons and ways that you can do it.  This is an extremely important point.

Compass Pointing the Way to Business OpportunityWe all have a challenge or three to deal with.  Don’t shy away from them.  Meet them head on with:  What if I could?  When you ask yourself this you start tying to come up with a creative way to get by the challenging moment.  What you come up with will be a unique product of your experience, and your experience only.  No one else could come up with the same solution.  The more you ask yourself those questions, the greater the chances are that the answer(s) to the opportunity will be something truly fantastic.

Read the previous chapter, Access Your Potential

Read the next chapter, “What If?” and we’ll talk more about opportunities around and inside of us.