The Junk Drawer

Awhile back, I knew a lady who helped operate a museum/thrift store existing within the walls of a little old white church. Upon browsing the curiosities, I noticed a beautiful box-like structure, covered in some kind of plaster in which all kinds of little things had been pressed– buttons, thimbles, pins, wooden spools for thread, safety pins, bottle caps. I was touched by the sincerity of the expression of the unseen hand that had put this all together, with what most certainly was a lot of love. junkdrawer01I imagine those things came out of a junk drawer and the person that had an attachment to them, recognized their value by creating this artifact.

Very quickly my little moment of contemplation was interrupted by a female voice behind me, an attendant caretaker working behind the till. “That’s not for sale,” she said, “Frieda’s mother had made it.” Frieda managed the community thrift in close proximity to the museum. Typically the goods, once sorted, made their way to one of two places: either the antique store and museum in the old church or, alternatively, the community thrift. The finer things went to the museum and were consequently sold as antiques, for a higher price or not sold at all, but found a home where they could be appreciated by many travellers passing through the little town.

Simple enough one would think to sort the quality of the items, but I’m sure it’s not so. Like the sound of wind chimes speaking to the soul, the old box covered in plaster and things that probably landed in the junk drawer had spoken to the one who determined their importance, spending the precious commodity called time to caretake over them– those things that almost always wind up in a drawer with such an unfortunate name.

How often in life do we fail to acknowledge that the little things have greater value than we think. If, today, in fact, we think at all, bothering to take the time to do so, since we are increasingly governed on auto-pilot by apps promising to do more for us and quicker. Always we think, quicker is better. Indeed, that box covered with plaster and all those little things took more time and attention than most people today care to allow in their daily smart phone-worlds which, in fact may, by revelation, turn out to be quite phoney.

It’s amazing indeed, that something made by someone no longer living can reach down through time and mesmerize the eye of the current beholder. It’s amazing how the value of the seemingly insignificant can be raised to the level of museum quality rather than merely the community thrift side of things– something so priceless it can only be called soul. It manifests into this world by those actions we focus our attention upon, for the right reason. The priceless things in reality, it turns out, are often the very things that people take for granted.

Unfortunately, we spend our lives placing our time and consequently our money on things that really have very little value in the scheme of things.

What pay-off do we have if all our resources go to the wrong place? It’s interesting to think of how the things that matter to the soul can’t be sold, just like that plaster box is not just any old plaster box, the same goes with how we value anything that has meaning. What matters to one may seem little and foolish to another, but most important is that we value people, especially the ones who need it most. Let’s consider for a moment:

Proverbs 21:13 says, Whoso stoppeth his ears at the cry of the poor, he also shall cry himself, but shall not be heard.

It is up to us to value the homeless people who have wound up in society’s junk drawer and recognize what they teach us about ourselves and where we are placing our attention.

It is given to each of us a portion and of that portion we must make the most to see that “the good” gets spread around appropriately. Yes, our leaders must be equitable, but we cannot expect them to wave magic wands to solve the problems of the world. We, as individuals, must take personal responsibility for the issues that face the homeless, the disabled and handicapped, the mentally ill, the working poor, the overworked business person, the starving artist, the burnt out nurse and doctor, the confused over passionate person like me who can barely eat sometimes because she’s too wound up, and the many people who, very soon, will be out of work due to our new technologies.

If we treat the homeless like they belong in the “Junk Drawer” of society’s priorities, we are missing a very important point. These are probably some of the best souls that we currently have on the planet. Souls that were so sincere and delicate, they could not tolerate the false foundations that our world has been built upon– foundations that wouldn’t exist if people knew the truth.

Nature has so much bounty. Try working with it and you will see. Grow a tomato and try and count the seeds. It would take a very long time just to do that.

People need to be allowed to work with their soul, to recognize that the current school systems are so geared towards perpetuating themselves they have forgotten the most important thing. It is not merely human intellectual pursuits that matter. To have that at the forefront of our educational system is in great error and if not corrected will cause much suffering in society as a whole on all levels as we shall see. Making proper changes is the only thing we should make haste with since our world is on fire and no one wants to live in a burning house.

The question of what changes need to be made will need to come from deep within the souls of each individual person upon this planet. It is incumbent upon all of us now to recognize if we do not make necessary changes in our own personal lives and scrutinize how we can build more positive structures with a moral core as its foundation, then we will face greater tribulation.

I have a bible I found at the community thrift. Strange, it really should have been located at the museum, but I was fortunate for where it was placed because I couldn’t afford it had it been classed as “antique”.

The book has a navy blue cover. It’s a King James Version, a 1967 edition.

Mathew 4 reads:

Then was Jesus led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tested by the devil. And when he had fasted forty days and forty nights, he was afterward |hungry|.

And when the tempter came to him, he said, If thou be the Son of God, command that these stones be made bread.

But he answered and said, “It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God.”

***

There is much to learn from scripture whether you study in English or Hebrew and there exist many faiths in various languages that bear the same seeds of truth and yield positive fruits.

Today, however, we witness to the fact that cheap fast food is placed higher on our priorities than quality bread made at home or in a small “caring” bakery. If we really understood how little food we need to live, if it were of good quality, we would understand how we have been misled.

People race foolishly around, not knowing what is the matter. They sit in idling vehicles breathing exhaust so that they can drink another coffee in a paper cup.

Let’s think of children for a moment. They are very close to the soul because they just came over from that other place. They can sense the falseness even if they don’t understand.

Children’s spirits need feeding. All of the ice cream in the world will not satisfy the human soul. It’s time to live the truth and it will set us free.

Haileevale